How can I take control over the credit card, medical bills, and/or student loan debt?

Millions of Americans are struggling to overcome debt that has hit them in all phases of their lives. You leave college already owing thousands in student loans. Credit cards offer only a temporary solution during times of financial hardship.

Although it may seem that medical bills, credit card bills, and student loans will never let you catch up, the Texas Debt Relief Center can show you how to regain control. Bankruptcy is only one option in overcoming your never-ending debt. A Houston debt relief attorney can show you all of your options.
 

CREDIT CARDS

Credit card companies offer credit to anyone that will take it. In times of financial hardship, it is difficult not to see credit cards as an easy solution until things turn around.

What looked like a good deal at first can change quickly and put you in a real bind: Almost 75% of credit card offers include low promotional rates, which issuers could revoke after a single late payment.

When you cannot make your monthly minimum, the late fees and over limit fees begin piling up and dragging you down further. In 2009 alone, credit card companies charged cardholders an estimated $20.5 billion in penalty fees. Lenders are also quick to start their harassment once the account goes past due.

Houston attorney Reese W. Baker can work with you to end the credit card stress and take control.
 

MEDICAL BILLS

When hit with a medical emergency, you would do anything to care for your loved ones. The resultant medical bills, however, can take down even the most financially stable person. In fact, a national study showed that in 2007 medical bills contributed to 62.1 percent of all bankruptcies.

Just because you have experienced a medical emergency does not mean you should live the rest of your life in debt. Contacting a Houston bankruptcy lawyer can be the first step to the clean start that you deserve.
 

STUDENT LOANS

Intended to give you a professional job and a good start to your future, student loans can continue to hold you back as you struggle to repay them. Many people carry student loans long into their professional careers and still have them when starting a family.

In 2007-2008, the average student graduating from a four-year college had accumulated more than $22,000 in debt from student loans. Your financial future may already be in jeopardy before you even begin your career. Compounded with other bills to pay, student loan payments are just one more thing preventing you from regaining financial control.